Law Firms Never Take a Recess From Business Continuity

Jan 14, 2016

Law Firms Never Take a Recess From Business Continuity

BY Michaela Scampoli

As an attorney, you would likely agree that time is precious. There is little flexibility with contract deadlines, court dates, or client meetings. You do all that you can to build your case and prepare for these events, but there are some things that you simply can’t prepare for. Specifically, natural or man-made disasters.

Like most businesses, law firms are vulnerable to severe weather, fires, floods, and power surges. They are also susceptible to employee error. Whether their actions be intentional or accidental, the people working at your organization are often the biggest threat. User error can be as simple as opening an email that contains a virus- sometimes it’s just unavoidable.

Although most law firms have added backup practices to safeguard their data, not all are doing everything they can to make them ‘best practices’. Say, for example, your firm is backing up data once a day. Should something happen hours later (before the next day’s backup), there goes an entire day of productivity.

Your firm’s data also remains vulnerable when backups only occur on-site. Without a secure second copy, you’d have no way to serve your clients if your office is struck by disaster. If you’re only backing up raw data as opposed to application and server configuration files, it could also take you days to complete a restore.

So How Vulnerable Are You?

Law firms who do not have the IT resources to recover from major outages should be measuring just how much downtime they can afford. Here are some recent statistics to consider:

  • 140,000 hard drives each every week in the U.S. alone -American Bar Association
  • 79% of companies have had major IT failure in the past two years -Mozy
  • 93% of companies that lose their datacenter for over ten days file for bankruptcy within a year. -National Archives & Records Administration

An article by Attorney at Law Magazine also determined downtime by measuring billable hours. In their example, they determined that a firm with 25 employees who bill at $200 per hour each lost one hour of uptime per month, it would cost the firm $60,000 a year.

If the above statistics have left you pondering how to better protect your law firm’s data, we’re revealing best practices for legal IT in this success story.

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