How AirCon Technologies Restored Operations After The Fort McMurray Fire

Dec 02, 2016

How AirCon Technologies Restored Operations After The Fort McMurray Fire

BY Andrew Burton

Business Continuity

Earlier this week, wildfires burned in and around Gatlinburg, Tennessee, forcing residents and tourists to evacuate the area. The fire spread rapidly fueled by strong winds and dry conditions due to the Southeast’s worst drought in nearly a decade.

Those conditions and subsequent fire growth are reminiscent of the massive wildfire that erupted in and around the city of Fort McMurray, Alberta. That fire burned more than 1.2 million acres, destroyed 2,400 buildings, and displaced more people than any disaster in Canadian history. Damages have been estimated to be in excess of $9 billion. Many businesses in the region were severely impacted by the event, suffering extended periods of downtime.

Fort McMurray is located in the middle of Northeast Alberta’s Athabasca oil sands, the heart of one of Canada’s largest hubs for oil production. The fire resulted in an estimated loss of 1.2 million barrels of oil per day for two weeks, translating into $985 million in lost gross domestic product, according to The Conference Board of Canada.

AirCon Technologies, which installs and services fire suppression, air conditioning, heating, and air filtration systems on a broad range of mobile heavy equipment used for oil production, was one of the many businesses forced to evacuate during the fire. AirCon employees were unable to return to Fort McMurray for over 40 days, but they were able to return to operations quickly thanks to hard work, smart decisions, and the right technology.

“If we hadn’t had Datto, and had to rebuild from scratch [using our previous backup solution], it would take three days, and only provide data from four days ago,” said Liam Burgess, President and CEO of AirCon. “I’d estimate our company would have lost $30,000 in revenue in the process.”

To read the company’s story, check out: How AirCon Technologies Survived the Fort McMurray Fire

Subscribe to the Blog